Gendered violences, structures of privilege: A polemic against ‘men’s rights’ discourse (Part 2)

In the previous post (link here), I argued that MRA discourses on domestic and gender-based violence, particularly the idea that women misuse laws, and that there should be ‘gender-neutral’ laws, are divorced from the larger contexts of structural violence, and the fact that gender as we know it, is in itself, a system of inequality.

Here, I outline the second important fallacy in most MRA discourses on domestic violence and misuse of laws: that is, the over reliance of a very selective criteria of data and facts and figures. Continue reading

Gendered violences, structures of privilege: A polemic against ‘men’s rights’ discourse (Part 1)

This post has been gestating for a long time now.

When I started this blog, its primary aim was to be reflexive about my fieldwork experience, and to try and organise my thoughts for the eventual thesis. Of course, another significant aim – as such of any writing on a public platform – was to inform people, both peers and otherwise, about certain realities I’ve witnessed and engaged in with my work in Dharavi.

But I also think there is a larger issue at stake here. I’ve always maintained that anthropologists should make principled and political stances as and when we can, or are required to. Indeed the history of our discipline is replete with such examples. Continue reading